SARS-CoV-2 aka Covid-19 pandemic was first reported in China in December 2019 which was later proclaimed as a global pandemic that razed many lives, havocing long-term health issues and demolishing the various aspects of life globally. To restrict the spread of Covid-19, several countries put forward long-term lockdown periods to bring down the situation.

Effects Of Covid-19 Pandemic On Weight And BMI Among UK Adults

The strict lockdown was imposed in the UK in March 2020 which was relieved from June-July, later strict restrictions were rehashed from October. Besides lockdown resisted the blowing-up pandemic, to the contrary, it havoced serious individual-related health issues. Stress, lack of motivation, obesity, increased BMI levels masked the health of individuals.

Effects of Covid-19 pandemic on weight and BMI among UK adults

Research shows that two-thirds of the Uk adults were obese and the lockdown has severed the condition. Lifestyle during lockdown was deeply modified as irregular eating habits, long sleep durations, physical inactivity, lack of exercise, consumption of alcohol, and work from home have wrecked the health of individuals. The situation of those who were obese before the pandemic severed and caused serious outcomes. People from different parts of the UK completed an online survey in April and May as they reported physical inactivity, overeating, and weight gain during the first phase of lockdown. They admitted visible weight gain and failed to limit the barriers of weight management. The consumption of sugars, fats was exceeded and the research found an increase of 56% of snack intake during the period.

The studies reported an increase in weight/BMI of 1.57 kg/ 0.31 kg/m2 in the first three months of lockdown which were associated with lifestyle, socio-demographic and behavioral factors. The online research concludes an increase in weight/BMI during the first phase of lockdown in the UK.

A longitudinal study among 18818 UK adults involving 35 surveys was conducted in long term. It analyzed the long-term health progress of individuals during the months from May-June 2020, August- September, and November- December. The surveys cornered the period into phases to result in a genuine conclusion. The surveys covered weight, height and socio-demographic, Covid-19 related interventions, and behavioral measures. The research supervised self-reports from individuals weighing 74.95 to 75.33 kg and BMI 26.22 kg/m2 to 26.36 kg/m2 increased from May to June 2020. But the later phase shows a decrease in weight/BMI of November /December. The research from May-June to November-December shows a sudden increase in weight/BMI in the first phase but a consistent decrease of 75.06 kg and 26.27 kg/m2 by reaching the phase of November – December. The studies masks significant variation among individuals in weight/BMI course of individual vulnerability regarding food and alcohol consumption and other changes during the pandemic.

The average weight/BMI levels of UK adults saw a sudden increase during the first phase of lockdown. Later the increase in weight/BMI levels reduced and returned to baseline levels in the months November – December. The period was severe to those who have health issues like heart disease and obesity as it worsened their condition. A growth of BMI 1.54 kg / 0.31 kg/m2 was reported on average in the initial months of lockdown. Changes were not identified in uniform as the research among the UK adults shows an increase in weight gain in the early phase which declined radically in the latter phase.

The results are of long-term health impacts on the pandemic on weight/BMI changes. The results help to guide health care and attention to the majority population to an increased risk of poor health outcomes of weight gain and obesity. The research is an alarm to the vulnerable population which exposes the association between the phase of pandemic and its effects on long-term change in weight/ BMI levels. The crisis caged the door and indeed deeply modified the lifestyle, eating habits, and sleep patterns of UK adults which resulted in poor health and an increased weight/ BMI level.

December shows a sudden increase in weight/BMI in the first phase but a consistent decrease of 75.06 kg and 26.27 kg/m2 by reaching the phase of November – December. The studies masks significant variation among individuals in weight/BMI course of individual vulnerability regarding food and alcohol consumption and other changes during the pandemic. The average weight/BMI levels of UK adults saw a sudden increase during the first phase of lockdown. Later the increase in weight/BMI levels reduced and returned to baseline levels in the months November – December. The period was severe to those who have health issues like heart disease and obesity as it worsened their condition. A growth of BMI 1.54 kg / 0.31 kg/m2 was reported on average in the initial months of lockdown. Changes were not identified in uniform as the research among the UK adults shows an increase in weight gain in the early phase which declined radically in the latter phase. The results are of long-term health impacts on the pandemic on weight/BMI changes. The results help to guide health care and attention to the majority population to an increased risk of poor health outcomes of weight gain and obesity. The research is an alarm to the vulnerable population which exposes the association between the phase of pandemic and its effects on long-term change in weight/ BMI levels. The crisis caged the door and indeed deeply modified the lifestyle, eating habits, and sleep patterns of UK adults which resulted in poor health and an increased weight/ BMI levels.

Author

Riley kai is a Registered Dietician who has been passionate about doing things the natural way and helps people with diet plans. She has been a nutritionist editor who has a great passion for nutrition and writing. She has written hundreds of articles on Oprah Magazine, LA Times, and a few more. She explains well through her articles so users get thrilled about reading her tips on healthy eating, Trends, nutrition science, and much more. Her undergraduate certification in Nutrition, Food Science, and Dietetics was completed from the University of Vermont. She earned a Masters’s degree in Nutrition Communication from Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. She taught cooking and nutrition classes to health-conscious people while her research at Griffin Hospital, Connecticut as a Lead Research Dietician.

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